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Chemical Injuries to the eyes. Emergency, intermediate, and long term care

Author: Nelson JD, Kopietz LA.

Publication: Postgrad Med. 1987 Mar;81 (4):62-6, 69-71, 75

The first step in treatment of chemical injuries to the eyes is immediate, thorough, and if necessary, prolonged irrigation. Ophthalmologic consultation should be obtained early in the course of treatment, and in severe injuries an anterior chamber tap (paracentesis) may be of benefit. Topical cycloplegics and antibiotics should be administered and a “bandage” contact lens placed to protect the corneal epithelium. If the eyelid is involved, care must be taken to protect the cornea and provide a moist local environment. Long-term care of a severely injured eye is fraught with difficulties, including glaucoma and recurrent corneal ulcerations.

The quality and effectiveness of the Morgan Lens speaks for itself.  I manage an Emergency Department in a rural area with minimal staffing and the Morgan Lens system is equivalent to having an additional staff member because it frees the RN to do other things while the Morgan Lens system does its job.  

Registered Nurse (Wisconsin)

MorTan Inc.

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Why Use The Morgan Lens?

The Morgan Lens is used in 90% of hospital emergency departments in the USA and can be inserted in less than 20 seconds. There simply is no other "hands-free" method of eye irrigation. Nothing else frees medical personnel to treat other injuries or to transport the patient while irrigation is underway. Nothing is more effective at treating ocular chemical, thermal, and actinic burns or removing non-embedded foreign bodies, even when the patient's eyes are closed tightly. Its design makes it simple and straightforward to use so minimal training is required.