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Continuous Flow Perfusion of Gentamicin with a (Morgan Lens) Reduces Bacterial Colony Counts in Experimental Pseudomonas Keratitis

Author: Rootman DS, Krajden M

Publication: J Ocul Pharmacol 1993 Fall;9(3):271-6

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Abstract: We have previously shown the pharmacokinetic value of delivering gentamicin to the rabbit anterior segment using the Morgan Therapeutic Lens. The present study utilized an intrastromal injection model of Pseudomonas keratitis to test the therapeutic efficacy of continuous flow delivery of gentamicin with the Morgan Lens. All eyes (n = 52) received an intrastromal injection of approximately 1800 colony-forming units (CFU) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. At 22 hours after injection, eyes were perfused for 6 hours with saline or gentamicin (1, 2.5 or 5 mg/ml), or received gentamicin drops (13.6 mg/ml) at 15 minutes for four doses, then hourly for 6 hours. Corneas were homogenized and plated to determine bacterial survival, and expressed as log colonies (CFU). Log CFU recovered were 7.37 +/- 0.04, 6.64 +/- 0.20, 5.64 +/- 0.31, and 3.56 +/- 0.50 log CFU for saline perfusion, 1, 2.5, 5 mg/ml gentamicin perfusion respectively. Following six hours of treatment with topical fortified gentamicin drops, 5.93 +/- 0.34 log CFU were recovered. Gentamicin perfusion (5 mg/ml) was significantly different from saline or the other treatment groups (P < 0.05). Continuous corneal perfusion with the Morgan Therapeutic Lens demonstrated an increasing dose response curve with increasing perfusate concentration. It was effective in the treatment of experimental Pseudomonas keratitis.

While beginning to wear contact lenses, I had an experience which the use of the Morgan Lens saved the day.


I was just finishing a sixteen-hour shift as manager and staff nurse of the ED when I was notified that they had received a bomb threat.  Disaster situation were part of my duties, so I went into action.  By 4:00 AM, I realized I still had my contacts in.  So I got a container and soaked them in an eye solution from our eye tray.  I arrived home with enough time to take a quick nap before returning to work for another sixteen-hour shift.  When I put my contacts in, I felt like someone had placed a hot poker into my eyes.  I took the contacts out, but my eyes continued to burn and were also fire engine red.  I did report to work at 7:00 AM but my eyes continued to burn.  I then decided the best thing I could do was to irrigate, so I placed a Morgan lens into both eyes and irrigated with 1000 cc of lactated Ringer's.  Laying down during the irrigation process was relaxing and I felt no discomfort while my eyes were irrigated.  After the process, the burning was relieved and I was able to complete my shift without further discomfort.

Registered Nurse (South Carolina)

MorTan Inc.

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Why Use The Morgan Lens?

The Morgan Lens is used in 90% of hospital emergency departments in the USA and can be inserted in less than 20 seconds. There simply is no other "hands-free" method of eye irrigation. Nothing else frees medical personnel to treat other injuries or to transport the patient while irrigation is underway. Nothing is more effective at treating ocular chemical, thermal, and actinic burns or removing non-embedded foreign bodies, even when the patient's eyes are closed tightly. Its design makes it simple and straightforward to use so minimal training is required.